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Bulgaria's Presidential Hopefuls: The Low-Profile Candidates (Part 3)

23 October 2016 11:13:03 Novinite.com (Sofia News Agency)

There are as many as twenty-one presidential pairs running the forthcoming elections in Bulgaria, all competing to take over the office of President. While a head of state does not enjoy too many powers, but virtually serving as a broker between institutions and a key stakeholder in shaping the country's agenda and vision, being able to call consultations, veto bills, and make key appointments. Novinite has so far given detailed information only about six of the candidates - those either considered front-runners or being somewhat linked to the governing coalition ( Tsetska Tsacheva , Rumen Radev , Krasimir Karakachanov , Ivaylo Kalfin , Traycho Traykov , Tatyana Doncheva ). We have also adhered to data from the first poll published in October which gave an edge to those candidates. Going down the list, the apparent "losers" should not be underestimated, though, as many of them are either being suspected as puppets of other parties that will "drain" votes in the first round or - what is worse - have openly indicated they will not be voting for themselves. Others have a background that could easily raise eyebrows. Another group had their names entangled in a scam with the so-called "media packages" handed out to them for their campaign, even though the election watchdog of Bulgaria denies the affair took place. In the third part of our series about the non-traditional presidential candidates, the list is completed with several candidates who have never stood out for too high political ambitions or active positions in the national public space. Rumen Galabinov , an economist, and lawyer Veska Voleva (his running mate) were the first presidential pair to submit its documents. The two have kept a low profile over the years and are now calling for Bulgaria's tighter allegiance to NATO and the EU, a more active effort toward judicial reforms, and a crackdown on corruption. Additionally, a debate is needed in Parliament on a number of economic issues, and it is the President's job to trigger it, Galabinov believes. He and Voleva are running as independents. Voleva has defended a number of clients suing lending institutions and, in a recent interview, has said any candidate other than that of GERB, the main ruling party, is worth endorsing in the runoff vote. Plamen Paskov , a Bulgarian entrepreneur who studied Veterinary Medicine and nowadays runs a business that involves software used in the same field, is running as an independent candidate. His Russian-registered company (Russian clinics being his main clients) are one of the two things he is known for, the second one being his unsuccessful bid to run for Mayor of the town of Dimitrovgra last year. Backed by nationalist Ataka party, he garnered just 1.55% of the vote. Svetozar Saev, his running mate, is also an entrepreneur and an activist backing the application of the Modern Monetary Theory. Paskov is often sought by Russian media outlets as a political commentator on affairs in Bulgaria, Russia, and the United States. Diana Dimitrova , also an indepenent candidate, was a member of Novoto Vreme, a party founded by several public figures back in the mid-2000s. She studied English Language and teaches it nowadays, having worked for the universty of Veliko Tarnovo and schools in the towns of Vidin and Smolyan. Her running mate, Gabriel Gerasimov, is an entrepreneur who tried to make it into Parliament in 2014. He was formerly affiliated to the State Security. Gospodin Tonev is a former lawmaker (1997-1998) and was a member of the Union for Democratic Forces (UDF)'s leadership for much of the 2000s. He now shares Christian Democrat views and gives lectures on the issue of a "social market economy". His running mate, Andrey Andreev, is a musicologist who heads the Philharmonic Orchestra of Plovdiv, Bulgaria's second-largest city, and several other institutions. He was also a lawmaker in a Great National Assembly in the 1990s and became one of the few MPs who than refused to sign the new constitution. You can also read here the first and second part of our series about the unusual Bulgarian presidential hopefuls.

Vice All News Time23 October 2016 11:13:03


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Krasimir Karakachanov, a Nationalist Candidate Benefitting from Bulgaria's Migrant Crisis

11 October 2016 09:06:17 Novinite.com (Sofia News Agency)

When Krasimir Karakachanov ran for president of Bulgaria in 2011, as head of nationalist VMRO-BND party, he garnered a meagre 0.99 percent of the vote. Five years on, benefiting from the migrant crisis and from support of un unlikely alliance, his result may turn out much different. Karakachanov, a veteran politician and lawmaker who first made it into the National Assembly in 1997 (and earned a set in two subsequent legislations), was endorsed all three main nationalist parties of Bulgaria in the summer - a rare show of unity just months before the presidential elections of November 06. His VMRO-BND party is one of the two main partners in the Patriotic Front (PF) coalition, which doesn't have ministers in the cabinet but backs it, taking turns to either defend its policies or set conditions and threaten to leave the minority government in tatters by withdrawing its support. The other PF party, the National Front for Salvation of Bulgaria (NFSB) is presided by Valeri Simeonov, who was once a Burgas-based entrepreneur and whose cable TV station, SKAT, once helped notorious nationalist Volen Siderov rise to fame and paved his way into politics - and whose alliance with Siderov turned into bitter enmity as Simeonov set up his own party. It is the "nationalist" and the "migrant" cards and tactical concerns that help Karakachanov and Simeonov, who joined forces to make it into Parliament in 2014, stick together. In reality, they differ ideologically as the former leans to the left, wh ile the latter is more right-of-center, nowadays sticking to Bulgaria's affiliation to NATO and the EU and heavily advocating private initiative as a backbone of the economy . Seeing parliamentary support for his Ataka party plummet (Ataka barely made it to Parliament in 2014), Siderov also endorsed Karakachanov, offering 59-year-old MP and lawmaker Yavor Notev, who has had a seat in all three Parliaments since 2009 and was a Deputy Mayor candidate last year, as a running mate. The presidential pair insists that what distinguishes them from other candidates is their love for Bulgaria, whose interests they put first before everything else and will "defend categorically." "Bulgaria faces yet another illegal wave of migrants, a Neo-Ottoman Turkey a number of domestic problems... we want to show there are politicians who, despite harsh words, can do it in the name of preventing all disgrace that can fall on Bulgaria's shoulders," Karakachanov told private bTV station on October 10, just two days into the election campaign. "Our goal is to meet a maximum number of people and talk them into a new, Patriotic Bulgaria, and not Bulgaria of divisions: left-right, Russophiles-Russophobes, monarchists-republicans." "This division turned Bulgaria into the poorest and most miserable state in Europe... It is only unity that can produce the force to lead Bulgaria out of this crisis. I am therefore convinced that we will go to a runoff," he added, sitting next to one-time rival Siderov. While most candidates vehemently declare a moderate-to-high degree of certainty they will make it to a second round, Karakachanov stands more chance than others as Market Links, the polling agency which published the first survey on presidential candidates' projected share of votes, put support for Karakachanov at 7.9% - the third-best result after the nominees of GERB (19.8%) and the Bulgarian Socialist Party (14.9%). With some of the bigger political parties working to actively spearhead a debate on the "right" response to an increased inflow of migrants (and the rush of panic and hysteria it has triggered among many segments of Bulgarian society), Karakachanov may see rising support throughout the campaign, as the PF is commonly associated with controversial decisions such a the so-called "burqa ban" and measures to step up border security in the face of possible "migrant" threats. Ataka, for its part, had endorsed the cause of "migrant hunters" who perform "citizen's arrests of migrants". This may appeal to a part of the electorate which, for different reasons, perceives the crisis as a threat to national security and identity and a potential source of higher crime rates. Karakachanov, 51, graduated from the Faculty of History at the Sofia University. His grandfather took part in the so-called "People's Tribunal", an institution set up in December 1944 to crack down on opponents and lead to a peak of violence in the country, with people known as dissenters being being handed fast-track death sentences or sent behind bars. The nationalist presidential candidate was recruited as an agent working for the State Security, the omnipresent Soviet-era institution in Bulgaria that was the equivalent to Stasi in Germany, even though this happened in 1989, the last year of communist rule. The department he worked for was dedicated to the so-called "Macedonian issue". Eight years later, he headed the VMRO-SMD organization (later, becoming a party, renamed to VMRO-BND) which was the heir to the controversial, two-headed illegal organization called VMRO that, back in the Third Bulgarian Kingdom and until 1944, fought for the freedom of Macedonia from Yugoslav rule but in the meantime wrote some of the violent chapters of the kingdom's history. Karakachanov was first a lawmaker in 1997, running on the ticket of the United Democratic Forces (UDF) led by Ivan Kostov. Eight years later - and after a four-year hiatus - VMRO won several seats again as part of a coalition, with Karakachanov again finding his way into the legislature. In 2011, when he ran for President, he made an emphasis on demographic policies, improving education, nationalization of companies overtaken my monopolies, a bigger army, a stronger presidential mandate (including the right to call a referendum and to assume the National Ombudsman's duties), gender equality, and an adherence of Bulgaria's foreign policy to "Bulgarian national interest", "without any concerns stemming from our membership in NATO and the EU".

Vice null Time11 October 2016 09:06:17


Krasimir Karakachanov, a United Voice of Nationalism as Migration Concerns Rise

10 October 2016 16:21:44 Novinite.com (Sofia News Agency)

When Krasimir Karakachanov ran for president in 2011, as head of nationalist VMRO-BND party, he garnered a meagre 0.99 percent of the vote. Five years on, benefiting from the migrant crisis and from support of un unlikely alliance, his result may turn out much different. Karakachanov, a veteran politician and lawmaker who first made it into the National Assembly in 1997 (and earned a set in two subsequent legislations), was endorsed all three main nationalist parties of Bulgaria in the summer - a rare show of unity just months before the presidential elections of November 06. His VMRO-BND party is one of the two main partners in the Patriotic Front (PF) coalition, which doesn't have ministers in the cabinet but backs it, taking turns to either defend its policies or set conditions and threaten to leave the minority government in tatters by withdrawing its support. The other PF party, the National Front for Salvation of Bulgaria (NFSB) is presided by Valeri Simeonov, who was once a Burgas-based entrepreneur and whose cable TV station, SKAT, once helped notorious nationalist Volen Siderov rise to fame and paved his way into politics - and whose alliance with Siderov turned into bitter enmity as Simeonov set up his own party. It is the "nationalist" and the "migrant" cards and tactical concerns that help Karakachanov and Simeonov, who joined forces to make it into Parliament in 2014, stick together. In reality, they differ ideologically as the former leans to the left, wh ile the latter is more right-of-center, nowadays sticking to Bulgaria's affiliation to NATO and the EU and heavily advocating private initiative as a backbone of the economy . Seeing parliamentary support for his Ataka party plummet (Ataka barely made it to Parliament in 2014), Siderov also endorsed Karakachanov, offering 59-year-old MP and lawmaker Yavor Notev, who has had a seat in all three Parliaments since 2009 and was a Deputy Mayor candidate last year, as a running mate. The presidential pair insists that what distinguishes them from other candidates is their love for Bulgaria, whose interests they put first before everything else and will "defend categorically." "Bulgaria faces yet another illegal wave of migrants, a Neo-Ottoman Turkey a number of domestic problems... we want to show there are politicians who, despite harsh words, can do it in the name of preventing all disgrace that can fall on Bulgaria's shoulders," Karakachanov told private bTV station on October 10, just two days into the election campaign. "Our goal is to meet a maximum number of people and talk them into a new, Patriotic Bulgaria, and not Bulgaria of divisions: left-right, Russophiles-Russophobes, monarchists-republicans." "This division turned Bulgaria into the poorest and most miserable state in Europe... It is only unity that can produce the force to lead Bulgaria out of this crisis. I am therefore convinced that we will go to a runoff," he added, sitting next to one-time rival Siderov. While most candidates vehemently declare a moderate-to-high degree of certainty they will make it to a second round, Karakachanov stands more chance than others as Market Links, the polling agency which published the first survey on presidential candidates' projected share of votes, put support for Karakachanov at 7.9% - the third-best result after the nominees of GERB (19.8%) and the Bulgarian Socialist Party (14.9%). With some of the bigger political parties working to actively spearhead a debate on the "right" response to an increased inflow of migrants (and the rush of panic and hysteria it has triggered among many segments of Bulgarian society), Karakachanov may see rising support throughout the campaign, as the PF is commonly associated with controversial decisions such a the so-called "burqa ban" and measures to step up border security in the face of possible "migrant" threats. Ataka, for its part, had endorsed the cause of "migrant hunters" who perform "citizen's arrests of migrants". This may appeal to a part of the electorate which, for different reasons, perceives the crisis as a threat to national security and identity and a potential source of higher crime rates. Karakachanov, 51, graduated from the Faculty of History at the Sofia University. His grandfather took part in the so-called "People's Tribunal", an institution set up in December 1944 to crack down on opponents and lead to a peak of violence in the country, with people known as dissenters being being handed fast-track death sentences or sent behind bars. The nationalist presidential candidate was recruited as an agent working for the State Security, the omnipresent Soviet-era institution in Bulgaria that was the equivalent to Stasi in Germany, even though this happened in 1989, the last year of communist rule. The department he worked for was dedicated to the so-called "Macedonian issue". Eight years later, he headed the VMRO-SMD organization (later, becoming a party, renamed to VMRO-BND) which was the heir to the controversial, two-headed illegal organization called VMRO that, back in the Third Bulgarian Kingdom and until 1944, fought for the freedom of Macedonia from Yugoslav rule but in the meantime wrote some of the violent chapters of the kingdom's history. Karakachanov was first a lawmaker in 1997, running on the ticket of the United Democratic Forces (UDF) led by Ivan Kostov. Eight years later - and after a four-year hiatus - VMRO won several seats again as part of a coalition, with Karakachanov again finding his way into the legislature. In 2011, when he ran for President, he made an emphasis on demographic policies, improving education, nationalization of companies overtaken my monopolies, a bigger army, a stronger presidential mandate (including the right to call a referendum and to assume the National Ombudsman's duties), gender equality, and an adherence of Bulgaria's foreign policy to "Bulgarian national interest", "without any concerns stemming from our membership in NATO and the EU".

Vice null Time10 October 2016 16:21:44


UDF MPs face Section 65 whip, seek court redress after Harry Mkandawire petitions Speaker

20 May 2016 01:24:24 Malawi Nyasa Times – Malawi breaking news in Malawi

Eleven United Democratic Front (UDF) members of Parliament (MPs) who moved to the government benches in Parliament who gone to...

Vice All News Time20 May 2016 01:24:24


UDF pins hopes on AK Antony’s campaign

24 April 2016 00:16:25 The Asian Age

Congress Working Committee member A.K. Antony will start his campaign for UDF candidates from Kasargod from May 1. He will cover all districts during the whirlwind campaign, which will end with a road show in Thiruvananthapuram on May 14, the last day of electioneering. With Opposition leader V.S. Achuthnanadan taking various districts by storm, the UDF, particularly the Congress, is banking heavily on Mr Antony to turn the tide. Many UDF insiders feel that Mr Antony is the one who could lead the electoral battle effectively against the LDF than chief minister Oommen Chandy and KPCC president V.M. Sudheeran as he has a clean image and is also the tallest leader in the front. During the last elections too, the last day of the campaign had seen a roadshow led by Mr Antony in the coastal areas of Thiruvananthapuram district which fetched good results for the UDF. Sources said that the upper hand the UDF got by pulling out the liquor prohibition agenda in the first phase of the campaign had slowly faded with Mr Achuthanandan coming out with an all-out attack on the UDF government. Though the UDF has been focusing on the development initiatives taken by the government in the past five years to retain power, it faced a volley of allegations, especially those related to solar scam and bar bribery and land assignment issues. These have been highlighted by Mr Achuthanandan during his campaign which he kick-started from Kasargod on April 20. It was in the background of such allegations that the party wanted Mr Antony to lead the fight. The high command also wanted him to be in the forefront as Sonia Gandhi and Rahul Gandhi viewed him as the tallest leader of the Congress in the state.

Vice All News Time24 April 2016 00:16:25


UDF's Murorua Is Back in Parliament

12 February 2016 13:20:20 WN.com - Africa News

Windhoek -United Democratic Front (UDF) vice-president Dudu Murorua on Wednesday made his comeback to parliament after a 12-year absence. ......

Vice All News Time12 February 2016 13:20:20


Crisis brew in Malawi’s ruling DPP

12 February 2016 04:38:07 Malawi Nyasa Times – Malawi breaking news in Malawi

Two legislators in Phalombe are asking the ruling Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) to discipline the party district governor who has allegedly been holding meetings with traditional leaders to switch off their allegiance to the members of parliament. Kudontoni: Plays down internal crisis Denis Namachekecha and Amos Mailosi are alleging the DPP district governor Reuben Makata is telling traditional leaders that the two MPs had defected to the main opposition, the Malawi Congress Party (MCP), an allegation they say is totally false. "This is not the first time the district governor has been causing problems. This has negative impact in our development agenda in our respective areas," said Namachekecha. Mailosi on the other hand asked the party leadership to intervene on the matter as soon as they can, saying the situation has potential of dividing the party. Namachekecha and Maiosi won the 2014 parliamentary elections as indepedent candidates having floored DPP candidates in their respective areas. The district governor Makata could neither confirm nor deny the allegations levelled against him by the two legislators. Party regional governor for the south Charles Mchacha said the party is aware of such political problems in some areas including Phalombe and would soon deal with the issues decisively at an appropriate time. DPP secretary general Ecklen Kudotoni downplayed the issue, saying “ it will be resolved.” The differences in the DPP come at a time when the former ruling party, the People's Party is also sailing through turbulent waters as power struggle continues. The situation is similar in MCP where some regional chairmen are accusing party leader Lazarus Chakwera of high level nepotism. The United Democratic Front (UDF) is struggling to deal with dissent in the party following the firing of party vice president Iqbal Omar and some officials.

Vice All News Time12 February 2016 04:38:07


MCP reaction to Malawi electoral reform ‘intriguing’ – Activist

29 January 2016 13:20:59 Malawi Nyasa Times – Malawi breaking news in Malawi

Human rights activist and researcher for Center for Human Rights and Rehabilitation (CHRR), Mankhumbo Munthali has said statement that opposition Malawi Congress Party (MCP) are still consulting on the call for voting system of electing a Head of State to be changed from the current first-past-the-post to one for a 50 per cent plus one law to ensure that the winner of presidential elections enjoyed majority support is “intriguing.” CHRR’s Munthali: Push for electoral reforms is vital MCP president Lazarous Chakwera, who is also leader of opposition in parliament, has been on record saying the current set up has "failed voters". Under the current first-past-the-post system, the winner takes all. The opposition wants to move to a system of universal legitimacy. But President Peter Mutharika had an audience with officials from the Malawi Electoral Commission (MEC) recently, he urged MEC to resist the temptation to push for changes as a response to sectoral complaints “as opposed to a real and genuine national concern.” MCP public relations officer Alekeni Menyani is however quoted in the press saying the party was “consulting on the 50%+1 to win the presidential election and will come up with a position once the party has agreed". His comments drew a slew of criticism from CHRR’s Munthali. Wondered Munthali: “MCP was MCP still consulting? Have we all not often been told by MCP leadership particularly its leader Dr. Lazarus Chakwera and spokesperson Dr. Jessie Kabwira that MCP supports the 50% plus one. The local media can attest to this. Does this mean that Dr Chakwera and Dr Kabwira have been preaching 50% plus one gospel without consulting their constituents?” Munthali added: “Does it mean that MCP is suddenly contemplating on possibly changing its earlier position after realising that there is some possibility that they might benefit from the current system just as DPP did in the 2014 elections? If so, what does this say about MCP's adherance to principles, and most importantly principles of democratic governance? MCP's reaction is not only surprising but raises more questions than answers.” The human rights campaigner said in a broader view, MCP comments by Menyani may also reflect the perennial problem of lack of principles and ideologies that has characterised Malawi political parties since the re-introduction of multi-party democracy in 1993. “The issue of 50 plus one- without prejudicing any opposing views- must be supported as a key governance issue that would enhance legitimacy even if some political individuals think otherwise- that is limiting their chances to acquiring power,” Munthali stated. According to The Nation , United Democratic Front (UDF) has backed Mutharika’s position as UDF spokesperson Ken Ndanga is quoted saying: “Our view was that we should at all cost avoid looking at just a particular election or dealing with electoral problems that are exclusive to a particular political party. The reforms are a very important aspect of our electoral process and should be prioritised.” Munthali said it is “not surprising “ to learn about DPP and UDF holding some reservations to some sections of the current electoral reforms particularly the proposed absolute majority (50 percent plus one on Presidential race), DPP and UDF are in a parliamentary working relationship. Civil society groups and opposition political parties are pushing for the electoral reforms following chaotic tripartite elections held in 2014 which were marred by several irregularities and resulted in several court challenges. The push for electoral reforms is backed by the United Nations (UN) which argued that the reforms would enhance the country’s democracy despite political risks associated with the exercise. UNDP country representative Mia Seppo warned that leaving misalignments in the current laws unaddressed would impede progress and development in the country observing that electoral reforms have been a recurring subject during the post election period since 1999. University of Malawi political science lecturer at Chancellor College, Boniface Dulani (PhD), said the reform proposals have been discussed in several forums for a number of years now and it was time to take them to the next level. “There are three years between now and the next elections. This in my view is sufficient time to enact the reforms into law,” he said as quoted by The Nation. CHHR’s Munthali told Nyasa Times that it is important that the political; leadership -whether those in the ruling and opposition - should be willing to stand up and enact the laws that are for the national good even if they might not work for them. The 50 plus one electoral law entails that where in a general election there is no candidate who gather 50 percent, there should be a run off for the top two candidates to determine the winner. Malawi’s interfaith organization, Public Affairs Committee (PAC) have recognised that 50 per cent plus one rule guarantees the leader acceptable, popular, majoritarian mandate. DPP leader Peter Mutharika was declared the winner of Malawi’s May 20, 2014 presidential election after defeating Joyce Banda. Mutharika, the brother of former president Bingu wa Mutharika, took 36.4 percent of the votes cast, Lazarus Chakwera of MCP garnered 27.8 percent of the vote and Banda’s 20.2 percent.

Vice All News Time29 January 2016 13:20:59


Ntaba back as presidential aide: Malopa axed from State House for insubordination, moved to Macra

12 January 2016 08:23:37 Malawi Nyasa Times – Malawi breaking news in Malawi

Bright Malopa who since 2014 has been Presidential aide on Communication Strategy has finally been removed from State House and relocated to Malawi Communications Regulatory Authority (MACRA) as Technical Advisor on Broadcasting. Malopa: Out of State House , relocated to Macra Ntaba: Doctor-cum-politician withdrew from diplomatic posting and is now hired as presidential aide Information from State House shows that Malopa has been “irrelevant” to the President’s office as he has been absent from duties will- nilly for many months now and authorities deemed “constructive resignation.” The former Malawi Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) Director General has been spending more time on his under-construction of a hotel project in Cape Maclear, Mangochi. In addition, Malopa has also been making foreign trips without informing the President, Chief Secretary and Chief of Staff, Nyasa Times understands. Under normal employment etiquette these three offices are supposed to know what State House officers are doing. In another development President Mutharika has hired Dr Hetherwick Ntaba as presidential advisor on domestic policy with immediate effect. ‘Talking computer’ in ipad era Ntaba between 1992 and 1994 earned the accolade of “Talking Computer” when he, comical Ali-like, and despite the obvious, defended the falling one party regime with such eloquence that he could have fooled “strangers in Jerusalem.” With the one party system destroyed and the Malawi Congress Party (MCP) in opposition, he continued practicing the art of oratory as a member of the opposition until his duplicity was exposed. Then, he made his first move, and came up with a bargaining chip: the New Congress for Democracy (NCD). Returning to his other creation, the NCD, he tried unsuccessfully to join the 2004 Mgwirizano Coalition bandwagon. Suspicious of him and his party, the coalition stayed away from him. Never one at a loss for what to do next, he sold his party, skills and talents to a very willing buyer: Bakili Muluzi and his United Democratic Front (UDF). And with this move, he was back on the ruling side, where the gravy train flows. Needless to say that having languished in opposition for a while, when the late President Bingu wa Mutharika ditched the UDF, he quickly made himself available and useful, assuring himself a continued ride on the gravy-train. He joined or co-founded the DPP, and was in the forefront demonising Muluzi and the UDF – where he had sought refuge briefly – as the Section 65 vs. Budget and Impeachment madness raged in Malawi. Along the line, he served as DPP Secretary General, fell out of grace, and resurfaced as Presidential Advisor and Spokesperson – until his client bit the dust. One thing that needs to be said to Ntaba’s credit is that through-out his dynamic career, especially in his chosen speciality and niche of defending unpopular policies, laws and governments; he serves whoever is willing to pay his body and soul with unflinching loyalty. He speaks the Queen’s language like his mother tongue and the same applies when he switches to his mother tongue, Chichewa. Not all people speak their own language that well! And check this out: Not too long ago, in the aftermath of British diplomat Fergus Cochrane Dyet’s expulsion, Ntaba, tongue-in-cheek, took on the British Foreign Affairs Department, saying contrary to what everybody was saying, the Malawi Government had not expelled the British envoy. It had merely “lost confidence in him”. Who does that? It’s like a spin doctor from the UK telling you that he or she has a better understanding of your vernacular language with its expressions. But that’s Ntaba for you. While such ingenuity would be praiseworthy – if invested in a good cause and used for the general good – in a prostitute, political or otherwise, it just shows how low he or she will sink to satisfy their clientele. For one, Dr. Ntaba’s political career, for all his close association with powers that be, isn’t endorsed by folks in his backyard. To prove this, he lost the parliamentary elections in a by-election to a then upstart – Willard Gwengwe and then lost again when DPP won re-election in 2009 even candidates who had no business of winning made to parliament and lost again in 2014. This speaks volumes. Putting it mildly, while in indulging in politics is always a gamble, being an unelected politician is even worse. It renders one prone to abuse by any client pulling the strings. And, as a result one’s political future winds up being subject to the fortunes of another – as has happened now to Ntaba. His fortunes at the polls underline one thing: political prostitution, though attractive in the short run from the perspective of personal survival, is generally frowned upon by voters, which is a good thing. Malawi has other people who can do what he does but for a good cause. He is old school. And like Mark Antony, he has to first bury Caesar before making his next move – which would in theory leave him at the end of the line. But like a true prostitute, he had, it appears, prepared for such an eventuality and made some initial moves. It may have gone unnoticed, but in fact Ntaba was the first to invest and gamble in the possibility of tables turning before anyone did. And he did this, very overtly on two or three occasions. It all remains to be seen. But one thing is for sure, Malawians haven‘t seen or heard the last of the ‘Talking Computer’. Whatever software is loaded into it, when rebooted, the Talking Computer r will make some sound bites which should only serve as entertainment.

Vice null Time12 January 2016 08:23:37


Omar faction demands UDF convention

31 December 2015 20:01:09 Malawi Nyasa Times – Malawi breaking news in Malawi

United Democratic Front (UDF) Central Regional officials backing expelled vice president Iqbal Omar on Thursday, took turns in calling upon UDF National Executive committee (NEC) to hold early elections in order to solve challenges which have emanated within the party. UDF members backing Omar addressing news conference Addressing a news conference at UDF Central Region headquarters, UDF senior members from Dedza, Lilongwe, Salima and Dowa, said accused the party president Atupele Muluzi for his decision of firing Iq’s Omar from the party. Alex Waziri said the only way to resolve the differences is to call for a party national conference. "We are calling NEC to hold a convention, we should elect new leaders who can lead the party towards the rightful direction," said Waziri. Waziri said during the convention "We will start afresh since Atupele has let us down," Said Waziri. Taking his turn UDF Governor for Salima Godfrey Katiwo praised former president Bakili Muluzi for taking care of the party during his time of leadership. "We are asking Atupele to borrow a leaf from the former chair who had a passion and love for the party," said Katiwo. During the news conference, Omar's Personal Assistant Ben Phiri (not related to State House’s aide) denied reports that Atupele gave Omar K23 million for campaigning during 2014 campaign.

Vice All News Time31 December 2015 20:01:09