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The Origins and Evolution of ISIS in Libya: a report

26 June 2017 15:25:35 Libya Herald

By Libya Herald reporter. London, 26 June 2017: A report on the origins of ISIS in Libya concludes that Western policy must seek to get Libyan militias and local councils to take ownership of governance and justice issues, rather than merely directing them to fight ISIS or other jihadists. It adds that ISIS is a

Vice null Time26 June 2017 15:25:35


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US air strikes hit Isis camps in Libya

19 January 2017 15:01:03 WN.com - World News

American forces have bombed two Isis camps in Libya as...

Vice All News Time19 January 2017 15:01:03


U.S. airstrikes in Libya on ISIS camps

19 January 2017 14:31:01 WN.com - World News

US B-2 bombers struck ISIS camps in southern Libya overnight, several US officials told CNN Thursday. ......

Vice All News Time19 January 2017 14:31:01


Fifteen years after 9/11, America in perpetual war

11 September 2016 20:51:53 The Asian Age

US military personnel lower the US flag at a memorial ceremony in honour of the 15th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks at the ISAF headquarters in Kabul on Sunday. (Photo: AFP) The 9/11 attacks of 2001 forever changed America and upended its foreign and national security policy, leaving the country for the past 15 years in a war against jihadists — without ending the upheaval in West Asia. Barack Obama, who will leave the White House in January, is the President who tried to get the US military out of the quagmires in Iraq and Afghanistan — devastating “war on terror” conflicts launched by his predecessor George W. Bush in the wake of the suicide plane strikes that killed nearly 3,000 people. But Obama’s legacy on that front is mixed, with US forces still present in both countries. And while he worked hard to bring America closer to the Muslim world, he will leave office with the United States bogged down in a seemingly endless conflict against Islamists at home and abroad, experts say. “The evolving threat of Islamist terrorism compelled President Obama, against his own inclinations, to engage militarily in Iraq once again, and since then in Syria and Libya as well,” said Tamara Cofman Wittes, director of the Centre for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution in Washington. “The wars in the Middle East, the metastasis of ISIS, online radicalisation and a series of attacks in European and American cities have made the paradigm of a ‘global war on terror’ very hard to set aside, even 15 years after 9/11,” she wrote on the World Economic Forum website. The US is also still engaged militarily, in limited form or on a purely logistical basis, in Afghanistan, Nigeria, Somalia and Yemen to counter myriad threats. “The thinking of the Obama administration is that big wars make things worse,” Hussein Ibish, a senior resident scholar at the Arab Gulf States Institute, told AFP. So instead, Obama launched a new era in American warfare — one dominated by drones, special forces and training for local fighters. The human and financial costs of such engagements are more limited — a significant fact, after the 5,300 US military personnel killed, 50,000 wounded and $1.6 trillion spent from 2001-2014 in Iraq and Afghanistan, according to Congressional data. Obama’s strategy had its best success in May 2011, when US special forces killed Al Qaeda leader Obama bin Laden, who masterminded the 9/11 attacks, at his home in Pakistan. But for Ibish, such a use of “limited resources... Looks like a continuous war.” “It is even more than a permanent war because the limited resources cannot change the instability. It accepts the current chaos as being unsolvable,” he added. In Syria, a lasting peace is still not at hand, though a fresh truce brokered by the United States and Russia — both now involved militarily in the deadly conflict — is due to begin Monday. And a US military re-engagement in West Asia is not in the plans of either of the candidates looking to succeed Obama — Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Fifteen years after the Twin Towers fell, forever changing New York’s skyline, Obama said the terror threat facing America had “evolved,” referring to lone-wolf attacks in the United States like the nightclub massacre in Orlando in June. “So in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria and beyond, we’ll stay relentless against terrorists like Al-Qaeda and ISIS. We will destroy them. And we’ll keep doing everything in our power to protect our homeland,” he said Saturday in his weekly address. As Amy Greene — an American researcher at the prestigious Institute of Political Studies in Paris (Sciences-Po) — pointed out, “there has not been an attack on US soil of the same scale” as the carefully planned 2001 attacks. Of course, Washington still fears more small-scale attacks carried out by homegrown attackers, like the Orlando shooting that left 49 people dead or the San Bernardino attacks last December that left 14 dead. Faced with ongoing threats, the United States has built up a massive surveillance apparatus in the post-9/11 era both at home and abroad. The budget for the CIA, FBI and National Security Agency has nearly doubled since 2001. “The threat that I think will dominate the next five years for the FBI will be the impact of the crushing of the Caliphate, which will happen,” Comey said this past week, referring to the Islamic State group. Since the passage of the Patriot Act after 9/11, legislation maintained by Obama, “Americans have accepted the idea of giving up some of their freedoms,” Greene said. According to a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center, 40 percent of Americans fear that “the ability of terrorists to launch another major attack on the United States is greater than it was at the time of the 9/11 attacks.” That is the highest share expressing that fear since 2002. On Saturday, the US State Department warned in its regular “worldwide caution” note to travelers on terror risks that the IS group had “called on supporters to attack US citizens and coalition partners wherever they are.”

Vice All News Time11 September 2016 20:51:53


15 years after 9/11, America in perpetual war

11 September 2016 17:58:53 The Asian Age

Barack Obama launched a new era in American warfare – one dominated by drones, special forces and training for local fighters. Washington: The 9/11 attacks of 2001 forever changed America and upended its foreign and national security policy, leaving the country for the past 15 years in a war against jihadists – without ending the upheaval in the Middle East. Barack Obama, who will leave the White House in January, is the president who tried to get the US military out of the quagmires in Iraq and Afghanistan – devastating "war on terror" conflicts launched by his predecessor George W. Bush in the wake of the suicide plane strikes that killed nearly 3,000 people. But Obama's legacy on that front is mixed, with US forces still present in both countries. And while he worked hard to bring America closer to the Muslim world, he will leave office with the United States bogged down in a seemingly endless conflict against Islamists at home and abroad, experts say. "The evolving threat of Islamist terrorism compelled President Obama, against his own inclinations, to engage militarily in Iraq once again, and since then in Syria and Libya as well," said Tamara Cofman Wittes, director of the Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution in Washington. "The wars in the Middle East, the metastasis of ISIS, online radicalization and a series of attacks in European and American cities have made the paradigm of a 'global war on terror' very hard to set aside, even 15 years after 9/11," she wrote on the World Economic Forum website. The US is also still engaged militarily, in limited form or on a purely logistical basis, in Afghanistan, Nigeria, Somalia and Yemen to counter myriad threats. "The thinking of the Obama administration is that big wars make things worse," Hussein Ibish, a senior resident scholar at the Arab Gulf States Institute, told AFP. So instead, Obama launched a new era in American warfare – one dominated by drones, special forces and training for local fighters. The human and financial costs of such engagements are more limited -- a significant fact, after the 5,300 US military personnel killed, 50,000 wounded and $1.6 trillion spent from 2001-2014 in Iraq and Afghanistan, according to Congressional data. Obama's strategy had its best success in May 2011, when US special forces killed Al-Qaeda leader Obama bin Laden, who masterminded the 9/11 attacks, at his home in Pakistan. But for Ibish, such a use of "limited resources... looks like a continuous war." "It is even more than a permanent war because the limited resources cannot change the instability. It accepts the current chaos as being unsolvable," he added. Evolving threats In Syria, a lasting peace is still not at hand, though a fresh truce brokered by the United States and Russia – both now involved militarily in the deadly conflict – is due to begin Monday. And a US military re-engagement in the Middle East is not in the plans of either of the candidates looking to succeed Obama -- Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Fifteen years after the Twin Towers fell, forever changing New York's skyline, Obama said the terror threat facing America had "evolved," referring to lone-wolf attacks in the United States like the nightclub massacre in Orlando in June. "So in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria and beyond, we'll stay relentless against terrorists like Al-Qaeda and ISIL. We will destroy them. And we'll keep doing everything in our power to protect our homeland," he said Saturday in his weekly address. Mass surveillance As Amy Greene – an American researcher at the prestigious Institute of Political Studies in Paris (Sciences-Po) – pointed out, "there has not been an attack on US soil of the same scale" as the carefully planned 2001 attacks. Of course, Washington still fears more small-scale attacks carried out by homegrown attackers, like the Orlando shooting that left 49 people dead or the San Bernardino attacks last December that left 14 dead. Faced with ongoing threats, the United States has built up a massive surveillance apparatus in the post-9/11 era both at home and abroad. The budget for the CIA, FBI and National Security Agency has nearly doubled since 2001. "The threat that I think will dominate the next five years for the FBI will be the impact of the crushing of the caliphate, which will happen," Comey said this past week, referring to the Islamic State group. Since the passage of the Patriot Act after 9/11, legislation maintained by Obama, "Americans have accepted the idea of giving up some of their freedoms," Greene said. According to a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center, 40 percent of Americans fear that "the ability of terrorists to launch another major attack on the United States is greater than it was at the time of the 9/11 attacks." That is the highest share expressing that fear since 2002. On Saturday, the US State Department warned in its regular "worldwide caution" note to travelers on terror risks that the IS group had "called on supporters to attack US citizens and coalition partners wherever they are."

Vice All News Time11 September 2016 17:58:53


Who pays for ISIS in Libya?

06 September 2016 01:31:47 Libya Herald

By Sami Zaptia. London, 5 September 2016: At the headquarters of the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) in Whitehall, London today, Hate Speech International (HSI) launched its report: “Who pays for ISIS in Libya?”. The report is authored by James Roslington and Jason Pack. Founded in Norway, HSI is an independent network of journalists researching extremism, hate

Vice null Time06 September 2016 01:31:47


ISIS Losing Ground in Libya

14 June 2016 00:58:13 Morocco World News

By Christopher Thomas Rabat - Libya, Morocco’s geographically closest neighbor facing a conventional invasion from the so-called Islamic State (also called ISIS), sees extremist forces pushed back. Central Libyan coastal town Sirte has become a stronghold for these radical Islamic fighters, but is now gradually entering the Government of National Accord (GNA)’s control. Forces supporting this UN-backed transitional government are fighting a multi-week offensive to drive ISIS out of the city. Resistance has been fierce. ISIS uses both conventional tactics and suicide bombings to slow the advance into the city. The GNA cited over 600 casualties, including 137 dead and 500 wounded throughout this operation. They have requested international medical aid for their injured soldiers. But despite the slow advance, ISIS forces are undeniably losing ground. The GNA has captured both the port and the airport. Middle East/North Africa expert and consultant Professor George Joffé of University of Cambridge told al Jazeera that this Sirte offensive “means that the new government in Tripoli has acquired credibility. We know that two other militias in the east have now decided to join up with militia, and there, we are seeing a nucleus perhaps of a new Libyan army beginning to be formed.” This is encouraging news for the GNA, but underscores that this government has yet to establish a formal military. It currently relies on allied militia groups. Still, these uniting militias are increasingly formidable, and have acquired several warplanes as part of a rudimentary air force. Sirte gained local notoriety as the hometown of dictator Muammar Gaddafi. The 2011 Arab Spring yielded a rebellion against Gaddafi in Libya, which was supported by NATO airstrikes. The war ended in Sirte, where Gaddafi’s government was decisively overthrown in October as he himself was killed. Rebel forces’ extrajudicial killings of Gaddafi and his closest advisors portended the chaos to come. Following the regime’s defeat, Libyan militias fractured and began infighting. This instability allowed ISIS to infiltrate the territory and establish its own conventional military in 2014. It currently consists of 4000-6000 troops, according to US Army General David Rodriguez, and enjoys an influx of foreign fighters from Tunisia and other nations. It has gained a foothold in Libya and has been holding on to Sirte, its largest city outside of Syria and Iraq, ever since. While many of its territories have been retaken by Libyan militias, often with the aid of American air strikes, ISIS remains a resilient force. Even following the likely loss of Sirte, the terrorist army is unlikely to vanish from the country completely. On December 17, 2015, two self-declared Libyan governments met in Skhirat, Morocco to sign a treaty forming the GNA. This UN-backed government seeks to unite disparate militias, political parties, and civil society groups to bring stability back to Libya. Its recent progress has been impressive, as has its success against ISIS. However, the rebellion against Qadaffi was similarly united against a common enemy until his defeat. After the common foe was killed, cooperation collapsed and civil war broke out. The Arab Spring, the pro-democracy movement of protests throughout the Arab World, revealed the difficulty of successfully establishing stable democratic governments. While protests emerged all across the Middle East and North Africa, only Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, and Syria broke their governments’ hold over national territory. Of these, Tunisia and Egypt established democracies. Today, only Tunisia’s fledgling democracy remains active. Libya faces the daunting task of reclaiming its nation from radical and foreign fighters, uniting disparate local militias, and forging a strong democracy. Despite this uncertain future, the Government of National Accord can celebrate an increasingly successful offensive today. The post ISIS Losing Ground in Libya appeared first on Morocco World News .

Vice All News Time14 June 2016 00:58:13


Is ISIS in Retreat in Libya?

21 April 2016 04:51:46 WN.com - World News

BENGHAZI, Libya (Reuters) - Islamic State fighters retreated from long-held positions around the port city of Derna on Wednesday, military forces in eastern Libya said, as troops loyal to the government in the region pressed on with an offensive in Benghazi. If the retreat around Derna is confirmed, it could mark a significant shift in the alignment of forces in the area. Try Newsweek: Subscription offers Islamic State gained territory in Libya as two rival governments and a range of armed factions battled to control the country in the past two years. But it...

Vice All News Time21 April 2016 04:51:46


Morocco Arrests ISIS-Linked Terror Cell

03 April 2016 17:11:38 Morocco World News

Rabat - Two terrorists in charge of financing and coordinating with fighters of the Libyan branch of the so-called Islamic State (ISIS) were arrested on Friday and Saturday in Casablanca and Had Soualem, as part of the ongoing investigations on the dismantling of a terror cell linked to ISIS's Libyan branch. The cell, which was operating in Marrakech, Essmara, Sidi Bennour and Had Soualem, intended to carry out terror attacks in Morocco mainly against security services, the Interior Ministry said in a statement. Investigations revealed that some members of this cell, who were planning to join ISIS camps in Libya, had contacts with some active ISIS members in Libya in charge of logistical support with the aim of joining this terrorist organization before returning to Morocco to carry out terror attacks, the source pointed out. The 10-member terror cell linked to ISIS's Libyan branch was dismantled on March 24. With MAP The post Morocco Arrests ISIS-Linked Terror Cell appeared first on Morocco World News .

Vice All News Time03 April 2016 17:11:38


Isis's backup plan to retreat to Libya is falling apart

20 March 2016 16:58:01 WN.com - Africa News

Libya has become Isis's new frontier as it faces territorial loses in its...

Vice All News Time20 March 2016 16:58:01